MAY
2015
19

416 Snack Bar – Homemade Dunkaroos

    For 90s kids that grew up in Toronto who love typography (ahem, myself), this dessert is a dream come true. For those that don’t know, 416 Snack Bar is named after Toronto’s area code. Need I say more? I don’t think so.  

AUG
2014
03

Back to Basics: The Risograph

At the MoMA PS1 Bookfair, I fell in love with the product of the risograph, a printer released in 1986. One particular studio called Paper Pusher, based in Toronto, had a little booth showcasing a series of isometric designs for a calendar. Ever since, I have been searching for a low-cost risograph printer, which seems to be impossible to find. The possibilities of what you can create with a risograph are amazing. Because each colour is printed separately, risograph artists experiment with isolating and layering, trying to create the purest of hues. Flat colour is suddenly given depth. With digital technology,…

JUL
2014
22

On Ideas

“Ideas are to objects as constellations are to stars [translated from Trauerspiel, 1928].”  Walter Benjamin, The Origin of German Tragic Drama

JUL
2014
16

How to Create a Ligature

I love ligatures and as a result fell for this simple project by David Schwen. The most effective method of learning typography is understanding it. http://bumbumbum.me/2011/05/12/how-to-create-a-ligature-by-david-schwen/

JUN
2014
25

Architectural Postmodernism

Recently, I’ve been making a few trips to the Distillery District in downtown Toronto. I love the way the urban planners have used the former Gooderham and Worts Distillery to house an area for restaurants, breweries, bakeries and galleries (which in my opinion, are a little too commercial). My few trips have made me think about post-modernism quite a bit, and how we are picking and choosing the best bits of the past to create a surreal contemporary collage. The Distillery District is inspirational to me because it has made me wonder what other possibilities there are out there for a…

JUN
2014
25

Memory & Time

  “The work of memory collapses time.” Walter Benjamin, Berlin Childhood

JUN
2014
25

The Art & Science of Remembering Everything

“Monotony collapses time; novelty unfolds it. You can exercise daily and eat healthily and live a long life, while experiencing a short one. If you spend your life sitting in a cubicle and passing papers, one day is bound to blend unmemorably into the next – and disappear. That’s why it’s so important to change routines regularly, and take vacations to exotic locales, and have as many new experiences as possible that can serve to anchor our memories. Creating new memories stretches out psychological time, and lengthens our perception of our lives.” Joshua Foer, Moonwalking with Einstein; The Art &…